UHF RFID and UHF RFID tags components

UHF RFID is an acronym mouthful. UHF stands for ultrahigh frequency, while RFID stands for radio frequency identification. In some instances, this technology is replacing barcodes as a method of managing warehouse inventory and the supply chain. RFID tags are placed on each object and UHF radio frequencies read the stored data. A UHF RFID tag allows stock to be managed and tracked without an employee manually scanning each item.

UHF is a large radio band that ranges from 300 MHz to 3 GHz. Cell phones, pagers and satellite communications use this band, because it can be broken up into numerous sub-bands. The distance the tag is able to transmit depends on the UHF sub-band used, with lower frequencies having shorter ranges. The UHF RFID tag may use sub-bands that provide a range as small as 6 feet (1.8 meters).

UHF RFID requires three components: a transponder, an antenna and a transceiver. The transponder, or tag, contains data and is attached to the item. The antenna transmits the UHF radio signal to the transponder, powering and activating it. The activated transponder then transmits the data stored on the tag back to the transceiver. Data such as who is in possession of an item, where the item is during shipment and the location of an item in a warehouse can all be read from the RFID tag.

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