Why Choose a Passive RFID Tag?

A passive RFID tag is normally used in applications such as access control, item tracking, race timing, supply chain management, logistics, ticketing, cashless payments and more. The low price point per tag makes passive RFID tags economical and the short to medium read ranges are well-suited to applications where you need to read one RFID tag at a time rather than many tags at once.

Because passive RFID tags have no battery, the tag form factor tends to be smaller and inexpensive to deploy. Passive RFID tags also come in many different form factors, from RFID bracelets and key fobs to RFID smart labels and cable tags. The various sizes and form factors lend themselves to a range of RFID applications and the lack of battery means that the tags can operate for many years without the need for battery replacements or other staff support.

Despite its many advantages, you should also consider some of these disadvantages when choosing a passive RFID tag:

Passive RFID tags can be read at short distances, typically 6 cm to 30 cm. This creates reading limits for certain types of RFID applications.
Improper RFID tag antenna orientation towards the reader in some types of passive RFID tag applications can result in unstable reads.
Limited memory for data storage.
Reading through liquid or metal can be difficult for some types of passive RFID tags.

Typical Applications for Passive RFID Tags:
Consumer Goods Tracking
Small Item & Asset tracking
Ticketing & Payments
Vehicle Identification
Inventory Management
Access Control Applications
Rapid Transit Ticketing
Supply chain management
Work-in-process Tracking
Production Line Management
Race Timing Applications
Parking Lot Access Control
Festivals and Marketing Events

Five Most Common Field Questions for Read-on Metal RFID Tags

• What metal tags would you recommend?
There are many different considerations for choosing the appropriate tag for an application. Sometimes it comes down to the best price or the physical size and the form factor of the tag; but often it is the read range or the tag material, mounting material, attachment method and surrounding atmosphere (including the presence of metal, humidity, current, etc.) that affects the durability and the performance.

• Why is the read range of the tag different from lab tests?
Sometimes RFID tags are modified for use in the rugged environment, by adding a protective coating or using spacers so the tag isn’t mounted directly on metal. These measures can significantly reduce performance for tags that were not designed to be attached this way.

Very often, the read range of the RFID tag is reduced due to frequency detuning, especially when the tag is embedded or used in a metal rich environment. Non-optimized tags may work sometimes, but consistent performance requires an optimized product.

• How can the item be tagged?
Sometimes the RFID tag itself can perform fine in harsh environment, but the biggest challenge is keeping it attached to the item. A metal tag may withstand high temperatures or immersion in liquid, but its adhesive may not. Ideally, an RFID tag will be embedded within the item it is identifying, which provides maximum protection against impact and exposure. Embedding isn’t always practical.

Adhesive is one of the more common ways to attach a tag to an item. Choosing the right adhesive requires an understanding of the complete environment, not just the working conditions. Extreme cold can also affect adhesives and can make tags brittle, so consider storage and processing temperatures when specifying tags. Adhesives however won’t work for all environments and materials, so tags may need other attachment options such as screws or rivets, string ties or epoxy.

• What potential sources of interference are in the environment?
Just because a tag is not applied to a metal object doesn’t mean it does not need to resist interference from metal. Tagged objects may be placed in metal carts or racks, or moved to areas where there is a lot of metal. Carefully consider all the areas where a tagged object will be used or may need to be read so you can select a model that will provide reliable performance.

• Can a high temperature RFID tag meet different high temperature applications?
In general, no. High temperature RFID tags are subject to different use applications. For example, a tag designed to work well in dry heat may not work well in an autoclave application that sterilizes with steam under pressure, nor does it necessarily meet all the other conditions of the high temperature application.

High temperature and chemical resistance RFID tag OPP6019

The high temperature tag OPP6019 operates in the UHF frequency 840-960MHZ. It is specially designed to withstand extreme temperatures up to 230°С for 30 minutes ,180°С for 120minutes , IP68 protection rating and chemical resistance(such as Fuel B, mineral oil, petroleum, salt mist, vegetable oil).
Ergonomic and efficient, the high temperature tag OPP6019 displays reading distances of up to 4.6m with a mobile reader and 6.5m with a fixed reader. It is mainly used in industry for the identification in industrial furnaces,the multi-cycle passages in drying chambers and so on.

Functional Specifications
RFID Protocol:EPC Class1 Gen2, ISO18000-6C
Frequency:US 902-928MHz, EU 865-868MHz
IC type:Alien Higgs-4
Memory:EPC 128bits, USER128bits, TID64bits
Write Cycles:100,000times
Functionality:Read/write
Data Retention:Up to 50 Years
Applicable Surface:Metal Surfaces
Read Range(On Metal) :(Fix Reader:ThingMagic M6-E, 36dBm/4W)
630cm – (US) 902-928MHz, on metal
650cm – (EU) 865-868MHz, on metal
Read Range(On Metal) :(Handheld Reader: OP9908,R2000,33dBm/2W)
450cm – (US) 902-928MHz, on metal
460cm – (EU) 865-868MHz, on metal
Warranty:1 Year
Physical Specification
Size:60mmx19mm (Hole:D5mmX2)
Thickness:4.8mm
Material:PPS shell
Colour:Black
Mounting Methods:Adhesive, Screw,Binding
Weight:13g
Enivironmenal Specification
IP Rating:IP68
Withstands Exposure To:Fuel B, mineral oil, petroleum, salt mist, vegetable oil
Storage Temperature:-55°C to +200°C (230°С for 30 minutes, 180°С for 120minutes)
Operation Temperature:-40°C to +150°C
Certifications:Reach Approved,RoHS Approved,CE Approved
More info view http://www.oppiot.com/opp6019.html

OPP IOT can create/develop RFID tags to meet your unique material property or specific environmental requirements.
More info,please Contacts us:
OPP IOT Technologies CO., LTD.
Address: 2104 Room SANDI International Finance Centre,249# MingXin Street LongQiao,ChengXiang Putian City Fujian, P.R, China
P.C: 351100
Tel: (0086)594 2790031
E-mail: info@oppiot.com
WhatsApp: +86 180 3034 2267
Website:http://www.oppiot.com

high temperature UHF On-metal tag opp6019 for industrial markets and health care line

OPP IOT launched a high temperature UHF On-metal tag opp6019 for industrial markets and health care line. The high temperature RFID tag opp6019 is specially designed as the most rugged On-metal RFID tags in the world for harsh application environment. Except featuring On-metal usage and a new anti-UV industry grade polymer casing and IP68 Ingress Protection rating for outdoor applications, it could withstand long term super high temperature(230°С for 30 minutes, 180°С for 120minutes)), acid and alkaline resistance(Fuel B, mineral oil, petroleum, salt mist, vegetable oil).

OPP6019 RFID tags are with flexible installation, such as rivets, screws fixed, or two-side glue, super glue etc. The high level of durability improves RFID tag lifetime of up to 10 years, even for harsh industrial environments.

OPP IOT can develop RFID tags to meet your unique material property or specific environmental requirements.
More info,please Contacts us:
OPP IOT Technologies CO., LTD.
Address: 2104 Room SANDI International Finance Centre,249# MingXin Street LongQiao,ChengXiang Putian City Fujian, P.R, China
P.C: 351100
Tel: (0086)594 2790031
E-mail: info@oppiot.com
WhatsApp: +86 180 3034 2267
Website:http://www.oppiot.com

RFID tags in the industry can be a good choice

While barcodes are based on optical identification, RFID tags are read via radio waves. In industrial plants, especially in the ex-industry, the objects are exposed to strong demands. Barcodes can fade, pollute, or be obscured by other objects due to UV irradiation. These are only a few circumstances in which the barcode can reach its limits.

RFID Tags, however, have the ability to be captured without direct visual confirmation, thus guaranteeing flawless identification even in challenging and harsh industrial environments. An RFID system always consists of at least one tag and one reader / writer unit. Depending on the type of construction, tags can be active or passive. The electromagnetic induction of the RFID reader activates passive tags, whereas active tags have their own battery. They send their information in periodic intervals and have a much higher range than passive tags. In RFID, you distinguish between different frequency ranges, from LF over HF and UHF, up to rarely occurring SHF (Super High Frequency).

In addition to better legibility, RFID tags are also significantly more robust against physical and chemical environmental influences, such as abrasion and moisture. Furthermore RFID tags can be captured in groups, so that with a single scan, e.g. the volume of a complete euro pallet, can be recorded.

The significant difference between barcodes and RFID tags is primarily the handling of information storage. While the coded information of a barcode is permanently defined with its creation, it can be changed and adapted with RFID tags. Since RFID tags are not based on an optical system, they are also significantly less susceptible to falsification because they cannot be copied, photographed, or scanned.

RFID in library

Libraries all over the world are moving away from the traditional model of using barcodes to scan and check out books. While this method has been around since the advent of barcodes almost 40 years ago, rapidly evolving technology has meant that more efficient, streamlined library management solutions have been developed. The most recent technology, one that many of the largest libraries in the world have already switched over to, is Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID).

This involves affixing a tiny RFID tag onto each book, which allows it to be read by readers stationed across the library. The advantage of this technology over barcodes is that RFID technology does not require a direct line of sight. Thus, multiple books can be detected and checked out simultaneously, instead of having to scan every individual book. In addition, patrons can check their books out themselves, instead of relying on a librarian. This gives the librarian more time to help out other library members, and it lets patrons check their books out faster.

RFID also acts as a security guard on the premises, alerting the guards if a book leaves the library without being checked out. Thus, one single technology, RFID, can replace the existing bar code technology for checkout, as well as the EM technology for theft detection.

RFID also helps in re-shelving, since wrongly shelved books can be instantly identified without needing a line of sight read. Patrons searching for books can also find books much faster using a handheld RFID scanner, instead of having to manually look through the shelves.

Finally, RFID also lets patrons return a book anytime they want. This is because the RFID chip in the book can be identified by the reader in the book drop box, and the returned book can be recorded. A librarian does not need to be physically present to collect the returned book, and so the library effectively stays open 24/7.

Given the many advantages that RFID has over traditional technology that is used in libraries today, many large libraries all over the world such as the Seattle Public Library in America and the Shenzen Library in China have already switched over to RFID.

RFID’s role in Oil industry’s consolidation process

As the world oil markets continue to be in flux, consolidation within the oil and gas industry, especially in North America, is accelerating. The small to medium business sector is seeing significant activity.

Companies are being acquired, not only for their customer base, but also for their assets. Organizations that are positioning themselves as acquisition candidates need to streamline their business processes and show enhanced visibility of their assets. This makes them more attractive to prospective acquirers. Using OPP IOT’s RFID based asset tracking solutions, these savvy companies not only achieve 100% visibility of their assets, but also can leverage them to streamline their business processes – processes to accurately check-in/check-out assets to and from jobs, efficiently manage maintenance and inspections of all their equipment, tie all this into their financial systems, etc. Being able to show end-to-end visibility of their assets along with streamlined operations, makes it easier for potential suitors to do due diligence on the companies, thereby making them more attractive targets. Not only do they position themselves well in the M&A markets, they also enjoy the side benefits of reduced operational costs resulting from efficient use of their assets and resources.

Once an acquiring company has completed a merger, they have to be able to quickly incorporate the new member into their operations. In order to make the unification efficient, companies standardize on using RFID based asset tracking solutions to maximize visibility of their augmented operations and asset inventory.

Mergers lead to additional company locations, servicing an expanded list of regions and geographies. It becomes even more important to know where all the assets are and whether they are being utilized optimally. Leveraging the visibility provided by our RFID solutions, oil and gas companies are able to make decisions about re-allocation of assets amongst the locations based on each region’s business needs. Further, they are able to make informed determinations on new purchases, balancing the requirements of each location. Excess equipment is either disposed of, or is leased out in order to reduce expenses and increase revenue. The rental side of the business can also leverage the RFID based asset tracking solutions, just like the mainstream business.

And of course, our solutions can also play a significant role in tracking maintenance and inspections of equipment across the entire company. As new divisions or regions are added, it is imperative that HSE policies of the parent company continue to be enforced and adopted. Our solutions show whether preventive maintenance and safety inspections are being done routinely, and can flag alerts if and when the occasional ball is dropped.

passive RFID labels and tags for Retailers Solution

Unlike simple barcodes, passive RFID labels and tags allow item-specific information to be programmed directly on the tag—SKU, serial number, date and place of manufacture, date of shipment, etc. When individual products are source-tagged or embedded into products at manufacture, this degree of information delivers near real-time item-level visibility and asset protection simultaneously. In essence, you are creating smart products that feed information back into your existing systems.

This integration of hardware and software enables an IoT-based solution that allows retailers to track when shipments leave a vendor, arrive at the store, enter inventory and are placed on the retail floor. The resulting data that is captured will allow you to make business process improvements that will drive:
*Precise forecasting
*Accuracies in the supply chain
*Effective replenishment processes

OPP4215 RFID Tags that Beat the Heat!

high temperature RFID tags
high temperature RFID tags

OPP4215 RFID Tags that Beat the Heat!

Need to track assets or machines exposed to extreme heat, high pressure or corrosive chemicals? OPP4215 is a perfect RFID tag for you.

Many industries process assets, products or materials at elevated temperatures using carriers or containers for transportation purposes. Frequently being able to reliably and uniquely identify and track the asset or container is highly advantageous, generating efficiency and compliance benefits.

OPP IOT found the marketplace was in great need of a tag that could survive repeated exposures in high temperature settings such as automotive paint booths, medical autoclave sterilization and manufacturing operations. The only available RFID tags on the market were, and continue to be, too large and bulky for most use cases, too expensive for large deployments and generally unreliable with an inconsistent resistance to high heat.

OPP IOT provides a RFID tags designed specifically for high temperature environments reaching 280°C. These products address the critical needs of customers with their combination of a small form factor, read range up to 7 meters and high temperature survivability – all at a very competitive price point.

More info view http://www.oppiot.com/uhf-metal-tags-dolphin-series-opp4215.html

10 types RFID tag Applications for Industrial

10 types RFID tag Applications for Industrial

RFID enhances Kanban systems
The modern “push” -based manufacturing concept with a Kanban system simplifies demand forecasting, as all necessary parts are refilled automatically. Small, flexible assembly units are formed. Parts bins are identified automatically and reliably using an RFID tag.

RFID manages access control
In manufacturing facilities, secure laboratories, company entrances, and public buildings, access rights must be controlled. This is accomplished using RFID technology. Authorized personnel gain access to an area by passing an RFID tag over a reader.

RFID enables proper food cooling
Modern food storage and refrigeration facilities make use of large vertical storage facilities. Typically, these facilities have high-speed, high-throughput automated storage and retrieval systems. Here, RFID tags get attached to a variety of transport and storage bins.

RFID as a “key” to control machine access
Complex, expensive, and potentially dangerous machines must be operated only by trained and authorized personnel. RFID supports an “electronic log book” used to record operational machine parameters in conjunction with the operator’s identity.

RFID is used in automotive final assembly
The large number of options offered in modern vehicles is a challenge for the automotive industry and can be addressed using RFID technology. Production-relevant data is made available for other processes, and sub-suppliers can be integrated into the logistics chain.

RFID optimizes order picking
In a warehouse, RFID helps to automatically trace each order during the entire picking process. Shipments can be optimized by combining multiple orders from the same customer, even if a new order is placed at the last minute.

RFID establishes internal tracking in meat processing plants
The safety and traceability of food is an increasingly relevant topic for producers, suppliers, and end consumers alike. In meat processing plants, RFID systems allow the collection of product-related data like weight, size, or upstream supplier at every processing point.

RFID makes machine tool manufacturing more accurate
For modern, fully automated CNC systems, RFID ensures that the right tool is used when processing a part. The exact selection of the right tool is accomplished using an RFID tag that is permanently mounted on the tool carrier.

RFID improves garment handling
Frequently, garments are stored and transported on clothes hangers. Irrespective of the size of an order, order line items must be handled automatically so that a single physical shipment is quickly collected. Expensive shipping errors can be avoided with RFID.

RFID boosts localization of greenhouse plants
Our final application example takes you to one of our customers’ sites: the Dutch company Anthura focuses on the propagation of anthuriums and orchids. In their modern central greenhouse, an RFID solution is part of a highly efficient automated container system.