IT Asset Tracking

Secure and efficient operation of data center is critical for companies and institutions. With data integrity,legal and industry compliance requirements becoming more critical, the ability to document critical server and SAN components is becoming more important than ever. Security and effective data center management starts from visibility of IT assets by real-time tracking and monitoring of servers, SAN tapes and disks, and critical IT components. Tracking thousands of assets in a typical banking data center, and ensuring that laptop computers leaving a building are authorized to do so—and are with the properly authorized users—is a cumbersome task for bank security officers.

Laptop Tracking:
Employees and contractors entering and leaving the building often carry laptop computers that, in many cases, are the property of the organization but are assigned to a specific person. To track the laptops and ensure none leave in the wrong hands, security guards at the doorway would inspect individuals’ computer bags and, upon finding a laptop, would look up the serial number listed on the computer in a company directory, to determine who was authorized to use that machine. The guards would then have to determine whether the individual holding the laptop was the one to whom it was assigned.

This system was time-consuming, led to long queues as employees left the building, and was a source of frustration to both security gaurds and workers. With the RFID system, the process was automated. Each laptop computer has attached to a passive tag with a unique ID number. That number is linked in back-end system to the computer’s serial number, make and model, as well as the name and a photo of the individual authorized to use it.

Industrial Asset Tracking

Radio Frequency Identification is a ideal technology for tracking assets. Now there is no need to store full description about them every time. RFID tags are the simpler way to track them. Every tagged asset can be tracked by reading the upcoming radio signals from each tag.

Our asset tracking tags enable you to instantly get the general location of tagged objects anywhere within a specified space. Asset tracking allows you to monitor the status, location and availability in your extended operations; manage your assets on demand by knowing where they are and boost production by getting your assets where they need to be without delay. Integrate your business processes with on demand knowledge of work-in-process manufacturing, and make more informed decisions.

Asset tracking can be used in various industries like baggage handling, parcel handling, supply chain, service industries, distribution logistics and manufacturing companies to identify goods & objects in an industrial environment.RFID Industrial Asset Management is a powerful tool to boost business activities for the maximum profits. The Tag Factory tag products meet the requirements of harsh industrial environments.

Logistics Pallet Tracking

The cost and profitability in the supply chain management largely depends on the efficiency and quality of the transportation. The challenge is to move quantities quickly with the least amount of handling in the most efficient and profitable way possible. One of the latest tools to manage quantity distribution is radio frequency identification (RFID) applied to plastic and wooden pallets and reusable plastic containers (RPCs)..

RFID tags, like the tag factory products, can help solve some of the logistical problems that affect the pallet/RPC industry. Inefficiencies in logistic tracking, lost and misplaced containers, inaccurate data on usage rate that can result in incorrect customer billing and lost revenue.

The data needed to resolve these issues can now be written directly and stored on to RFID tags attached to RPCs as these items move throughout different points in the supply chain. Using RFID tags, companies are better able to manage their pallets and RPCs and obtain more accurate product data. With millions of pallets in use, it is important to have 100% accurate data about these containers at all times, and be able to track them with less labor.

Logistics Management

RFID tags application in Logistics management

what is Logistics management? Logistics management is a supply chain management component that is used to meet customer demands through the planning, control and implementation of the effective movement and storage of related information, goods and services from origin to destination. Logistics management helps companies reduce expenses and enhance customer service.

The logistics management process begins with raw material accumulation to the final stage of delivering goods to the destination.

By adhering to customer needs and industry standards, logistics management facilitates process strategy, planning and implementation.

Logistics management involves numerous elements, including:
*Selecting appropriate vendors with the ability to provide transportation facilities
*Choosing the most effective routes for transportation
*Discovering the most competent delivery method
*Using software and IT resources to proficiently handle related processes

In logistics management, unwise decisions create multiple issues. For example, deliveries that fail or are delayed lead to buyer dissatisfaction. Damage of goods due to careless transportation is another potential issue. Poor logistics planning gradually increases expenses, and issues may arise from the implementation of ineffective logistics software. Most of these problems occur due to improper decisions related to outsourcing, such as selecting the wrong vendor or carrying out delivery tasks without sufficient resources.

To resolve these issues, organizations should implement best logistic management practices. Companies should focus on collaboration rather than competition. Good collaboration among transportation providers, buyers and vendors helps reduce expenses. An efficient and safe transportation provider is also vital to business success.

OPPIOT technical company offer high quality rfid tags for Logistics management. we can custom any size,shape,special application according to your demand,welcome order rfid logistics management tag, Contact us now as follow:

OPRFID Technologies., LTD.
2104 Room SANDI International Finance Centre, 249# MingXin Street LongQiao, ChengXiang Putian City Fujian, P.R, China.
P.C: 351100
Tel: (0086)594 2790031
Fax: (0086)594 2790185
E-mail:
sales@oppiot.com
info@oprfid.com
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WhatsApp: +86 180 3034 2267

GPS VEHICLE TRACKING

One of the biggest fears of any car owner is not knowing where their vehicle is at all times.

Just the thought of handing your car over to a complete stranger for several days is understandably spine-chilling. Most people are aware of how a Global Positioning System (GPS) works. It is essentially a satellite tracking device which allows you to know the exact location of a particular place or object.

What we did was combine this useful technology to the auto transportation process in order to insure our customers of their vehicle’s safety. By equipping our trucks with this system, we can get updated positioning coordinates of their location at any given time.

By logging into our online VEHICLE  tracking system, you can receive updated information as well as actual map images of your vehicle’s location. This will assuredly provide anyone shipping their vehicle with peace of mind.

RFID Container tracking vs Satellite Container tracking

One recent article contrasting RFID and satellite tracking for cargo containers raised some interesting points. Unfortunately, instead of focusing on positive aspects of what satellite tracking could offer, it concentrated on making some fairly dubious assertions about the ‘faults’ of RFID. So, what is the truth about satellite versus RFID for Bulk container tracking?

Satellite communications that go beyond mere GPS information can provide information not only about the location of a container but also about its environmental conditions, whether it has been tampered with, and other useful data. What’s more, this can be achieved with in-transit containers virtually anywhere in the world. For some applications, such as tracking of munitions, hazardous materials, pharmaceuticals and other sensitive goods, having access to that kind of information in real time can enable the cargo’s owner to take immediate corrective action (if any is possible). For the majority of supply chain applications, however, access to this type of data at the point of receipt is perfectly adequate.

Misconceptions
The issue isn’t whether satellite communications between a container and a head office can offer benefits in certain applications, the issue is that the article misstates RFID’s capabilities, costs and limitations with the intent of supporting the assertion that, “RFID is not good for global supply chain usage and satellite is good. In fact, RFID usage is actually dangerous for applications in US seaports.” The article’s review of the benefits of satellite is sketchy at best. The major support for its premise is based on a biased and, in some cases, untrue evaluation of RFID.

Technical applications
The article states that RFID cannot be used globally because there is no worldwide agreement on frequencies and hasn’t been authorised for use in countries such as China. While true in some measure, the article overlooks the inconvenient and obvious fact that all major international trading countries including Japan and China have approved active RFID products operating at 433 MHz that are based on ISO 18000-7 standards. The global RF community is moving to authorise the common HF, UHF and microwave frequencies to enable RFID usage around the world. The frequency differences cited in the article apply to UHF, not in 433 MHz active tags. And, in any event, UHF systems are capable of handling those differences.

Infrastructure
The assertion that fixed location antennas might be difficult to place because of legal and operational issues is unsupported in real world application. Yard and port operators are installing various RFID reading systems to expedite shipments in and out of their facilities and to provide a value-add service to customers. Mounting readers on cranes and at certain locations at ground level address many reading needs. Readers on cranes and tugs can also provide absolute linking between container movement and the equipment or operator.

Timeliness & features
It is true that RFID typically works by having goods and containers move past a reader and that RFID data logging and e-seals offer historical data. Satellite can transmit the occurrence of unwanted events in a far timelier manner. In some instances, this can trigger urgent, necessary responses. In other instances, however, having this data go from the container to a head office isn’t a particularly efficient or even necessary scheme. Sometimes, having the container communicate directly with, say, the driver of a truck, is more efficient. If a refrigeration unit on a trailer fails, the driver, not the main office in some other state, is going to have to take corrective action.

ISO/IEC standards – ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009

ISO/IEC standards – ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009
ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009 defines the air interface for radio frequency identification (RFID) devices operating as an active RF tag in the 433 MHz band used in item management applications. It provides a common technical specification for RFID devices that can be used by ISO technical committees developing RFID application standards.

ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009 is intended to allow for compatibility and to encourage inter-operability of products for the growing RFID market in the international marketplace.

ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009 defines the forward and return link parameters for technical attributes including, but not limited to, operating frequency, operating channel accuracy, occupied channel bandwidth, maximum power, spurious emissions, modulation, duty cycle, data coding, bit rate, bit rate accuracy, bit transmission order, and, where appropriate, operating channels, frequency hop rate, hop sequence, spreading sequence, and chip rate.

ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009 further defines the communications protocol used in the air interface.

ISO/IEC standards – ISO/IEC 18000-6:2013

ISO/IEC 18000-6:2013 defines the air interface for radio frequency identification (RFID) devices operating in the 860 MHz to 960 MHz Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) band used in item management applications. It provides a common technical specification for RFID devices that can be used by ISO committees developing RFID application standards.

It is intended to allow for compatibility and to encourage inter-operability of products for the growing RFID market in the international marketplace. It defines the forward and return link parameters for technical attributes including, but not limited to, operating frequency, operating channel accuracy, occupied channel bandwidth, maximum effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP), spurious emissions, modulation, duty cycle, data coding, bit rate, bit rate accuracy, bit transmission order, and, where appropriate, operating channels, frequency hop rate, hop sequence, spreading sequence, and chip rate. It further defines the communications protocol used in the air interface.

ISO/IEC 18000-6:2013 together with ISO/IEC 18000-61, ISO/IEC 18000-62, ISO/IEC 18000-63 and ISO/IEC 18000-64 specifies the physical and logical requirements for a passive-backscatter, Interrogator-Talks-First (ITF) or tag-only-talks-after-listening (TOTAL) RFID system. The system comprises Interrogators, also known as readers, and tags, also known as labels. An Interrogator receives information from a tag by transmitting a continuous-wave (CW) RF signal to the tag; the tag responds by modulating the reflection coefficient of its antenna, thereby backscattering an information signal to the Interrogator. The system is ITF, meaning that a tag modulates its antenna reflection coefficient with an information signal only after being directed to do so by an Interrogator, or TOTAL, meaning that a tag modulates its antenna reflection coefficient with an information signal upon entering an Interrogator’s field after first listening for Interrogator modulation in order to determine if the system is ITF or not.

ISO/IEC 18000-6:2013 contains one mode with four types. The detailed technical differences between the four types are shown in the associated parameter tables.

Types A, B and C are ITF. Type A uses Pulse-Interval Encoding (PIE) in the forward link and an adaptive ALOHA collision-arbitration algorithm. Type B uses Manchester in the forward link and an adaptive binary-tree collision-arbitration algorithm. Type C uses PIE in the forward link and a random slotted collision-arbitration algorithm.

Type D is TOTAL based on Pulse Position Encoding or Miller M=2 encoded subcarrier.

RFID application in Hotel keyless room entry system

Hotel keyless room entry is arguably the most talked about hotel technology trend currently available.
It’s a game changer. Mobile access at hotels empowers guests with the ability to bypass the usual hotel check-in process. They skip traditional procedures and can head to their room more quickly to unlock their guestroom door through contactless mobile technology.

It has the potential to improve the guest experience substantially. Today’s guests, particularly those who fall within the Millennial demographic, have shown great appreciation for being able to use their mobile device during travel and hotel stays, even prioritizing packing a smartphone over a toothbrush, deodorant or even a driver’s license. Research even shows that 1 in 8 people are addicted to smartphones and spend an average of almost four hours a day using them.

A major component of keyless room entry at hotels is radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology. RFID technology has become a key component in the Internet of Things (IoT) as a means of tagging, or identifying, physical objects on the IoT network. Early projections predicted that 9.2 billion tags would be sold in 2015, up 2 billion from the year before.

RFID and RFID Applications

RFID and RFID Applications
Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the use of an object (typically referred to as an RFID tag) applied to or incorporated into a product for the purpose of identification and tracking using radio waves.
RFID can be used in a variety of applications, such as:
*Access control
*Tracking of goods
*Public transport ticketing
*Toll collection and contactless payment
*Transportation and logistics
*Libraries
*Passports and travel documents
*Identification of patients and hospital staff
*Airport baggage tracking
*Loyalty systems
*Race timing
*Ski resorts and ski-lift ticketing

There are many types of RFID tags, from contactless NFC smart cards used for ticketing applications, with a range of less than a couple of centimetres, all the way to windscreen mounted eTags used on toll roads, able to read a car travelling at 100kph with a range of up to 10 metres.

RFID Applications in Library

Within the walls of a modern library, there can be thousands of books, periodicals, CD’s and DVD’s. Managing this inventory can be very time consuming and costly to the library administrator. Even just one misplaced book can result in hours of wasted time and manpower to locate the lost item, because the book to actually needs to be seen in order to identify it.

Using RFID, a library is able to easily identify and locate out of place items. RFID helps to speed inventory processes, and enhances the customer experience by increasing product availability and delivering faster checkouts. This allows the library to improve its customer service, and maintain inventory accuracies that deliver rewarding experiences to library patrons.

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